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Gothic Lace ::: learn to knit lace with this free pattern

June 6, 2014

Gothic Lace Cowl or Scarf

Since we created The Simple Collection last year, we have wanted to bring a simple and clear beginner lace pattern to our knitters (and make a useful free pattern and tutorial for knitting teachers too!).

Emily originally created the Gothic Lace pattern for the beginner lace class she taught at Urban Yarns in Vancouver; but we are now making it free to all, with lace tutorials to get you started!

Gothic Lace features a simple, symmetrical, and repetitive lace pattern worked in worsted or aran weight yarn.  Following this free pattern you can make a short cowl in just a few hours, or a longer cowl or scarf by spending a bit more time!  The pattern includes both a lace chart and line-by-line text instructions, so that you can compare the two, and become comfortable knitting from a chart.

Knitting Chart Repeats

Our free beginner lace pattern Gothic Lace has a pattern repeat that is 8 stitches wide, and 12 rows tall.

We have created an in-depth tutorial to guide you through all the steps required to learn lace and make this lovely lace project yourself!  Grab some yarn, needles, and follow along with our ‘Let’s Knit Lace’ tutorial if you aren’t already comfortable with lace.

Gothic Lace Cowl

Gothic Lace::: Gothic Lace Project Details :::

Pattern: Free Pattern – download now!
Sizing: Short (Long) cowl is approximately 10 inches wide by 23 (46) inches long.  Scarf is approximately 8 inches wide by 60 inches long.  Finished size will vary depending on yarn, gauge, and how aggressively you block the finished piece.
Yarn: 200 (400, 400) yds worsted / aran weight yarn for short cowl (long cowl, scarf).  Sample shown in Malabrigo Worsted in ‘frost grey’
Needles: US #8 / 5mm needles
Gauge: 18 sts / 4″ in stockinette stitch… but as sizing is not crucial for this project, so achieving precise gauge isn’t too important.
Notions: stitch markers, darning needle, 8 buttons (if desired), 5mm crochet hook (for crochet button loop detail)

We love to share knit know-how and techniques, but most of all, we love the beautiful result!  This cozy cowl has a beautiful structural pattern which shows up best in solids or kettle dyed yarns.  You can use this project to showcase a set of beautiful buttons, or simply sew the ends of the cowl together if you don’t want to bother with buttonholes!

Gothic Lace Cowl Detail

I have finished my cowl with a delicate crocheted button loop detail, but if crochet makes you feel a little queasy, there are instructions for how to work simple knit buttonholes… or for an even easier finish just sew the ends together, no buttonholes required!

TCK-gothiclace-02

This cute and snuggly accessory looks great in a range of colours… here are a few example photos from my test knitters projects.

 

button-email-40Get Tin Can Knits Emails and we will let you know about new designs and tutorials as they are released.  We also have great specials and contests… don’t miss out!

 

SHARE this free pattern :::

Do you have friends who would like to try lace?  Share this post, or let them know about the great free patterns they could try from The Simple Collection.  And join in the conversation on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Pinterest and Ravelry!

Tin Can Knits on FacebookTin Can Knits on Instagram Tin Can Knits on Twitter Tin Can Knits on Pinterest Tin Can Knits Email Updates button-ravelry-40

Other patterns to perfect your lace skills:


Sunflower Shawl by Tin Can KnitsRaindrops Pullover by Tin Can KnitsLoch Mittens by Tin Can Knits

Let’s Knit Lace ::: a free beginner lace pattern and tutorial

June 6, 2014

Gothic Lace Cowl by Tin Can KnitsIf you have always wanted to try lace, but have been a bit too intimidated, now is the perfect moment, and we have an ideal pattern for you!

Grab your yarn, needles, and a copy of Gothic Lace, our free beginner lace pattern!  You can find all the project details (and more pretty pictures) in this post.

Gothic Lace Cowl SwatchWe made the Gothic Lace cowl in a worsted / aran weight yarn (Malabrigo Worsted) using 5mm needles, so it is a quick knit and easy on the eyes and the fingers.

Once you are comfortable with lace techniques, you can graduate to skinnier yarns and littler needles!  Use a solid or semi-solid colour yarn, because the lace pattern can get lost in variegated yarns.

Malabrigo Worsted

Malabrigo Worsted – this single-ply yarn gives great stitch definition, and the semi-solid colours really show off the lace pattern.

Getting Started :::

Gothic Lace PatternFollowing the Gothic Lace pattern, you can knit either a short cowl (wraps once around), a long cowl (wraps twice around), or a scarf.

For a cowl, cast on 49 stitches, and for a scarf cast on 41 stitches.  If you just want to make a little lace practice swatch just cast on 25 or 33 stitches.

To begin, you will knit 8 rows (this forms the garter stitch edge).

Gothic Lace Cowl

Next it is time to start the lace pattern!  The instructions say:

Repeat rows 1-12 of gothic lace pattern, following chart or written instructions…

As you can see, the lace section of the pattern is described by a lace chart, and also by line-by-line text instructions.  You can follow either the chart or the text instructions, or flip back and forth from one to the other!

Don’t understand charts?  We have an in-depth tutorial to help you learn how!

How to Knit Lace

When you are working a lace pattern, it is very important to read all of the abbreviations and chart notes carefully before you begin the pattern, so that you understand the chart.  In this pattern, you will learn that the chart shows right side (odd numbered) rows only.  All wrong side (even numbered rows) are worked as follows: k3, purl to last 3 sts, k3.  Easy Peasy Lemon Squeezy.

So you will start with row 1, following the chart or the text instructions:

Row 1 (RS):     k2, k2tog, yo, k1, [ssk, k1, yo, k1, yo, k1, k2tog, k1] repeat to last 4 sts, yo, ssk, k2

If this is your first lace project, there may be some instructions that you haven’t come across before.  Click the links to find out exactly how to work these stitches if they are new to you.

How to work common lace stitches :::

Lace is formed by increases (typically yarn overs to form the holes) balanced by decrease stitches.  Some of the most common stitches used are:

  • k2tog – knit 2 stitches together – is a right leaning single decrease [tutorial here]
  • ssk – slip, slip, knit – slip 1 knitwise, slip 1 knitwise, knit 2 slipped sts together through back loops – is a left leaning single decrease [tutorial here]
  • yo – yarn over – starting with yarn in back of work, bring yarn between needle tips from back to front, and then pass over RH needle to back of work, creating a new loop over the needle – this is a single increase which creates a hole in the work [tutorial here]
  • sl1-k2tog-psso – slip 1, knit 2 sts together, pass slipped stitch over the k2tog and off needles – this is a left leaning double decrease [tutorial here]

To make your first lace experience easier, place markers at the start and end of each pattern repeat.  The pattern repeats are indicated by the heavy vertical lines in the chart, and the square brackets [ ] in the text instructions.  So as you work row one, have 5-6 stitch markers ready to place on the needle in between stitch repeats.

For absolute clarity, let’s work row 1 together…

Row 1 (RS):     k2, k2tog, yo, k1, [ssk, k1, yo, k1, yo, k1, k2tog, k1] repeat to last 4 sts, yo, ssk, k2

blog-letsknitlace-09

You start by knitting 2 stitches, then working k2tog, then a yo, and one knit stitch.  These are the ‘edge stitches’.  Place a marker (PM) now, then work the lace repeat once [ssk, k1, yo, k1, yo, k1, k2tog, k1], then PM again to mark the end of that 8-stitch repeat.  You will still have 36 more stitches on the left-hand needle to work (or 28 if you are making the scarf).  So what do you do?  Well, a ‘repeat’ is called a repeat because you repeat it… So work that same 8 stitches [ssk, k1, yo, k1, yo, k1, k2tog, k1] 4 (or 3) more times, placing a marker after each repeat, until you get to the last 4 stitches of the row (no more repeats will fit).  Then you end the row with the ‘edge stitches’ on the other side, yo, ssk, k2.blog-letsknitlace-03

Your very first lace row is complete, and you have markers that indicate the start and end of each repeat, which make for easy checking.  Before you work the wrong side (WS) row, check that you have the correct number of stitches in each section; from right to left you should have 5 edge sts, then 4 or 5 sections with 8 sts each, then 4 edge sts, with your stitch count being the same as you cast on (49 sts for a cowl, 41 sts for the scarf).  This lace pattern maintains the same stitch count on all rows, because the number of sts increased (by yos) equals the number of stitches decreased by (k2togs, ssks, and sl1-k2tog-pssos).

After you have worked row 1, you will work row 2, which is given in the text instructions, and described in the chart notes, but not shown on the chart itself.

Row 2 and all following WS rows: k3, purl to last 3 sts, k3

The k3 at start and end of the WS rows create a garter stitch edge, which is a nice detail, because garter stitch doesn’t curl the way stockinette stitch does.

When you have finished row 2, you will look again to the chart or text instructions for working row 3.  As you will notice, rows 1, 3, and 5 are all exactly the same!  So you will get a lot of practice with this identical sequence of stitches.

As you work the lace, keep the markers in place (just slip them from the LH to the RH needle in between working the stitches).  Check after each RS row to ensure that you have the correct number of stitches in each section (5 edge sts, 8 sts per repeat section, 4 edge sts at end).  That way, if you make a mistake it is very easy to locate, and work back to fix it right away.

Gothic Lace Cowl

Rows 7, 9, and 11 are each unique, but keep the markers in place in the same locations, and simply work the combination of stitches indicated.  You will notice how the lace pattern as knit looks just like the lace pattern illustrated on the chart.

Gothic Lace Cowl

This is one of the great benefits of working from a chart; you quickly learn to see how the knit fabric should look, and are much less likely to make mistakes in your knitting, because the structure of the pattern will ‘make sense’.

blog-letsknitlace-05

Once you complete row 12, you are ready to start again at the beginning of the lace pattern. So go back to row 1, and start there.  As the pattern states:

Repeat rows 1-12 of gothic lace pattern, following chart A or written instructions, until piece measures approximately 22 (44) inches for short (long) cowl, or 58 inches for scarf.

After that many repeats of the pattern, you will be a lace expert!

Knitting Chart Repeats

Check out our How to Read A Knitting Chart tutorial to learn more about lace, colourwork, and cable charts.

All that remains is a bit of finishing.  If you’re making a scarf or a cowl without buttons, just knit 8 rows (removing markers), and bind off all stitches.

Gothic Lace Cowl by Tin Can Knits

If you are making a buttoned cowl, you have a couple of options.  You can work regular buttonholes within the garter stitch band:

… work buttonholes: k3, [yo, k2tog, k4] 7 times, yo, k2tog, k2

OR you can make crocheted button loops, as I have done in my sample (note: crochet abbreviations are American).

How to work crochet button loops :::

Using crochet hook and yarn, begin with WS of work facing, working into the bind-off row.

Foundation row (WS): Work sl-st into first 2 sts, [ch4, skip 3 bind off sts, sl-st into next 3 bind off sts, ch4, skip 3 bind off sts, sl-st into next 2 bind off sts] repeat 3 more times, sl-st to end.  This forms 8 button loops.

Crochet Button Loops

Next row (RS): work sc to button loop, [sc 5 times into button loop, sc once] repeat 7 more times, sc to end.

Crochet Button Loops

Voila!  You have a completed cowl or scarf!  After you weave in all yarn ends, and sew buttons on, you are ready for the last very important step: blocking.

Gothic Lace Cowl

Wet blocking is very important for lace, because it opens up the pattern, and sets the stitches.  You’ll see what I mean when you block your first lace piece.  We will share an in-depth tutorial on blocking lace in coming weeks, but for now, just follow these simple instructions:

HOW TO WET BLOCK ::: To wet block, soak your knit in lukewarm water, then lay it out on a towel, roll up and stomp on the towel to squeeze out as much water as possible. Finally lay out flat (pinning along edges if desired) until completely dry.

Learn more about blocking regular knit projects here.  These instructions will work just fine for this cowl or scarf.

Gothic Lace Cowl

LEARN LACE with a friend :::

Do you have friends who would like to try lace?  Share this post, or let them know about the great free patterns they could try from The Simple Collection.  And join in the conversation on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Pinterest and Ravelry!

Tin Can Knits on FacebookTin Can Knits on Instagram Tin Can Knits on Twitter Tin Can Knits on Pinterest Tin Can Knits Email Updates Tin Can Knits on Ravelry

Other patterns to perfect your lace skills:


Thistle Scarf by Tin Can KnitsTorrent Socks by Tin Can KnitsFalse Creek Cowl by Tin Can Knits

How to read a knitting chart

June 6, 2014

Charts are graphic representations of knitting instructions.  They are a compact way to illustrate more patterns that would take much more space if described in text instructions.

Charts also illustrate how a lace, colourwork or cable pattern will look once it is knit up, and this means that when you use charts, it is easier to see where you are in a pattern, and identify errors early.

After a bit of practice, most knitters find working from charts much more intuitive, quick, and simple than working from line-by-line text instructions.

Botany Shawl by TIn Can Knits

Chart motif from the Botany Shawl … this is an extreme case where writing out line-by-line instructions for this large-scale motif would be entirely impractical.

Each square is a stitch ::: start with the key

In a chart, each square represents a knitting stitch, similar to the way that each abbreviation in text instructions does (for example k2tog or p1).  The first thing you should check when you start knitting from a chart is the key or legend, and chart notes if they are included.  This will explain which symbols represent which kind of stitches.    Often, an empty square means to knit the stitch, and generally, a yarn-over will be represented by an O in the square. However, each designer may have a different format and set of symbols.  Once you understand the meaning of each of the symbols, you can proceed to knitting the chart.

Chart Key

The key (and chart) for our free beginner lace pattern, the Gothic Lace Cowl or Scarf… check it out!

Are all rows shown… or just the RS rows?

Charts will either show all rows (or rounds) or only illustrate one side of the work, usually the right side.  If the chart shows only right side rows, text instructions will be given for how to work the wrong side rows.  The omission of wrong-side rows is common in lace charts, because many lace patterns are simply purled on wrong-side rows.  As you can see from this illustration, the structure of the lace pattern shows up much more clearly when the wrong-side rows (which aren’t conveying much information) are removed.

Reading Knitting Charts

The Gothic Lace pattern shown two ways – with all rows shown, and with WS rows omitted. As you can see, the chart is more compact and relates more clearly to the structure of the knitted fabric when WS rows are omitted. Check out the free pattern here!

But how do I actually knit following a chart?

Once you’ve reviewed the key and chart notes, and determined whether all rows are shown, or just the right-side rows, you can get started knitting from the chart.

Typically, for right side rows, you will work the stitches one at a time from RIGHT to LEFT.

So where only right side rows are shown, this means that you read each row shown in the chart from RIGHT to LEFT.  To work the wrong side rows, follow the instructions given in the text or chart notes.

Reading Knitting Charts

If the chart shows BOTH right side and wrong side rows, you will work the RS rows from RIGHT to LEFT, and the WS rows from LEFT to RIGHT.

If you think of the chart as a picture of the finished fabric taken from the right side of the work, this makes sense, as the RS rows are worked one stitch at a time from right to left, and the WS rows are worked from right to left too… but on the opposite side.

A careful reading of the chart key is crucial in this case, because often chart symbols are worked in one way on the right side of the work, and in another way on the wrong side of the work (for example, knit on the right side, purl on the wrong side).

Reading Knitting Charts

What are the heavy lines?

Commonly, stitch and row repeats are indicated by heavy lines (or boxes) in the chart.  This is similar to the use of brackets in text knitting instructions.  So you would work the edge stitches one time, then work the ‘repeat’ stitches as many times as possible (always reading the set of instructions from right to left on right side rows), before ending with the edge stitches at the end of row.

Knitting Chart Repeats

Our free beginner lace pattern Gothic Lace has a pattern repeat that is 8 stitches wide, and 12 rows tall.

What do I do when I get to the end of the chart?

After you’ve worked the last (top) row of a chart, you would typically begin again at the bottom at row or round 1, if the stitch pattern is repeated several times.  The text pattern instructions will let you know how many rows / inches to work following the chart.

How to Read a Lace Chart

Lace patterns are often described only in charts, as they may have large stitch and row repeats can make writing out (and reading) lace patterns quite cumbersome.

At Tin Can Knits, 90% of our lace patterns use charts that only illustrate the RS of the work, because we find these types of patterns much more intuitive, simple and satisfying to knit.

How to Read a Lace Chart

The lace chart for the Sunflower Shawl shows RS rows only. You can see clearly how the chart motif corresponds to the knitted fabric.  You read the RS rows from right to left, and follow text instructions for the WS rows.

Of course, there are always exceptions to this rule, and when both sides of the work are charted, you will work the RS rows from right to left, and the WS rows from left to right, making sure to check the key so you understand how stitches are worked on the RS vs the WS of the work.

How to Read a Lace Chart

The lace chart for the Kits Kerchief includes both right side and wrong side rows, because they are required to work the lace motif.  You read RS rows from right to left, and WS rows from left to right.

How to read a Colourwork Chart

Fair-isle stranded colourwork is usually worked in the round, so that the RS of the work is always facing, you are working the knit stitch most of the time, and you can easily see the pattern forming as you work it.  However, there are some exceptions to the rule in which colourwork is worked flat (in rows).  Either way, charts for colourwork patterns will generally illustrate every round (or row).

If the pattern is to be worked in the round, then you will read every round from right to left.

How to Read a Colourwork Chart

Our free ornament pattern – Fancy Balls – includes three simple colourwork motifs, knit in the round. As you can see, all rounds are shown on the chart.

 If the pattern is to be worked flat, then you will read the right-side rows from right to left, and the wrong-side rows from left to right (in the opposite direction); in order for the pattern to form as designed.

How to Read a Colourwork Chart

The Goldfish cardigan is knit in rows. You read the RS chart rows from right to left, and the WS chart rows from left to right.  Because the fabric is stockinette stitch, you will knit all stitches on RS rows, and purl all stitches on WS rows, using the colour indicated.

As fair-isle colourwork is typically stockinette stitch (knitting all sts on the RS, purling all sts on the WS), the chart key will typically describe which colours to work each stitch with, rather than the kind of stitch to work.  So when you see a square that corresponds to CC1, you will knit one stitch with contrast colour #1.

How to Read a Colourwork Chart

The chart for the North Shore pullover includes several contrast colours, as shown in the key. You will knit all stitches in the colour indicated, unless the stitch is a decrease… as shown by the symbols for k2tog and ssk in rounds 19 and 21.

How to read a Cable Chart

Cable charts may either show every row or round, or show only right side rows, with instructions for ‘keeping in pattern’ given for the WS rows (typically you would knit the knits, and purl the purls).

One special feature of cable charts are the symbols for cable turns.  Cables are worked over more than one stitch, so the symbols for cable turns are more than one stitch wide.  As you can see from the antler cable below, c4b and c4f – cable 4 back and front – are worked over 4 stitches.  Be sure to review the chart key before you cast on!

How to Read a Cable Chart

This cute free hat pattern – Antler Hat – is knit in the round, following a chart which illustrates all rounds. Each round is read from right to left.

Know somebody who’s struggling with charts?

We’ve created this tutorial for you and your friends!  Help us continue to provide these great resources by sharing with your friends, and joining the chat on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Pinterest and Ravelry!

Tin Can Knits on FacebookTin Can Knits on Instagram Tin Can Knits on Twitter Tin Can Knits on Pinterest Tin Can Knits Email Updates Tin Can Knits on Ravelry

Do you have a specific question or concern about reading charts?  Let us know in the comments, and we will do our best to point you in the right direction.

Charted Delicacies from Tin Can Knits:


North Shore PulloverBotany ShawlSnowflake Pullover

How to work a yo – yarn over increase

June 6, 2014

Raindrops Pullover by Tin Can KnitsA yarn over (yo) is a single increase, which forms a hole in the knitted fabric.  It is the main increase used in lace knitting.

How to work a yarn over (yo) ::: 2 steps

  1. Bring yarn between needle tips to front of work
  2. Pass yarn over the right hand (RH) needle to back of work

The new loop over the RH needle is the new stitch.  Proceed to work the next stitch following the pattern.

 

 

When working a yarn over after a purl stitch, (working p1, yo, k1) the yarn is already in the front of the work, so simply pass it over the top of the RH needle to the back of the work, then work the next stitch as usual.

When working a yarn over that is followed by a purl stitch, (working k1, yo, p1) you must bring the yarn between the needles to the front, then over the RH needle to the back, and then between the needles once more so it is in the front of the work, ready for the purl stitch.

 

Gothic Lace PatternTry a free pattern :::

Get started knitting lace with our free beginner pattern, the Gothic Lace cowl or scarf!

Learn lace stitches, how to follow a lace chart or text instructions and how to use markers to keep the pattern flowing smoothly with this simple and quick project.

 

Love our resources?  Share them! Get our email updates, and stay in touch:

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How to sl1-k2tog-psso – slip 1, knit 2 together, pass slipped stitch over

June 6, 2014

Sl1-k2tog-psso (slip 1, knit 2 together, pass slipped stitch over) is a double decrease, meaning it decreases 2 stitches from the total stitch count.

It is worked in 3 steps, as you might imagine from the abbreviation sl1 …. k2tog ….. psso.  It is a left leaning decrease.

How to work sl1-k2tog-psso ::: 3 easy steps

  1. Slip one stitch, knitwise, from the left hand to the right hand needle,
  2. Knit the next two stitches on the left hand needle together (k2tog),
  3. Using the left hand needle tip, lift the slipped stitch up and over the k2tog, and let it fall off the right hand needle tip.

One stitch remains on the RH needle, two stitches are decreased.  Note: slipping ‘knitwise’ means that when you insert your RH needle into the stitch, insert it from front to back, as if to knit.

This decrease is considered a left leaning decrease.  Other left leaning double decreases are SSSK (slip, slip, slip knit… similar to ssk) and k3tog-tbl (knit 3 stitches together through back loops).  For a right leaning double decrease try k3tog (knit 3 stitches together).

For a central double decrease (it is symmetrical and doesn’t ‘lean’ either direction), work sl2-k1-p2sso (slip 2, knit 1, pass 2 slipped stitches over).

How to work sl2-k1-p2sso ::: 3 easy steps

  1. Slip 2 stitches together, inserting the RH needle tip from front to back through both stitches at once, as if you were working a k2tog,
  2. Knit the next stitch from the left hand needle,
  3. Using the left hand needle tip, left the 2 slipped stitches up and over the knitted stitch, and let them fall of the right hand needle tip.

One stitch remains on the RH needle, two stitches are decreased.

 

Practice makes perfect :::

We’ve created an extensive set of tutorials, and dozens of high-quality free patterns to get you started…  Check out our website for a complete list!  And help us continue to provide these great resources by sharing with your friends, and joining the chat on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Pinterest and Ravelry!

Tin Can Knits on FacebookTin Can Knits on Instagram Tin Can Knits on Twitter Tin Can Knits on Pinterest Tin Can Knits Email Updates Tin Can Knits on Ravelry

Perfect patterns for that lovely skein of lace yarn:


Bonny by Tin Can KnitsBranching Out Shawl by Tin Can KnitsEstuary by Tin Can Knits

And we have WINNERS!!

June 1, 2014

Thanks to everyone who entered our Big Spring Destash contest in the following week.

We never imagined there would be such a huge response… But I guess you are all as excited as we are about beautiful yarn!

Tin Can Knits Big Spring Destash

The Lucky WINNERS :::

Thanks again to everybody who participated!  The random number generator has spoken, and our 10 winners are:

1. knitone24 – Skein Queen Voluptuous
2. Justsmi – Old Maiden Aunt BFL 4ply
3. anno – Orkney Angora Aurora 4-ply
4. weavergal – Malabrigo Merino Lace
5. debbieknits5000 – Uncommon Thread ‘Sumptuous DK’
6. ahickman – Madelinetosh Tosh Merino DK
7. Tinkhickman – Yarn Pony ‘ShowPony 4-ply’
8. birchblanket – Skein Queen ‘Opulent Cashmere’
9. Georgethegirl – Shilasdair ‘Luxury DK’
10. bluepurlgirl – Kettle Yarns ‘Islington’

Each will soon be recieving a lovely package with the yarn noted above, and an ecopy of Handmade in the UK!  Are you one of these lucky winners? If so please contact me (via rav message to tincanknits) with your mailing address.  And remember, if you’d prefer the yarn to be sent to a friend on your behalf, that’s fine too, just include the details in your message!

 

and what?! BONUS PRIZES ::: 10 extra lucky winners

Since there was such an overwhelming response to our contest, so many knitters had so many nice things to say about our patterns, we decided to dip a little deeper into our prize barrel, and pick out 10 more lucky winners!  The 10 knitters will get a copy of the ebook of their choice: Handmade in the UK, Great White North, Pacific Knits, or 9 Months of Knitting!

GWN-cover-front-220high9-Months-of-Knitting-frontcover-220highHUK-Cover-220highPK-cover-220high

1. corknitter
2. sharonathemom
3. duinit
4. Carolynintheuk
5. Minnebelle
6. ilknur
7. stellasmum
8. brnscn
9. mgo1999
10. Northbrooke

Are you one of these lucky winners? We will be in contact with you via ravelry, to find out what your ebook of choice is!

 


 
button-email-40Didn’t win this time?  This probably won’t be the last time we have excellent yarn to give away… Get our email updates and we’ll let you know about new designs, tutorials, and subscriber specials!

BIG SPRING DESTASH… a yarn + pattern giveaway

May 22, 2014

Big Spring DestashIt has been nearly a year since we released our lace collection, Handmade in the UK, and this spring and summer we are bringing you a number of tutorials focused on lace, to help you get started if you are a newbie, or delve deeper into complex lace techniques if you already love lace!

button-email-40Wanna hear about these tutorials as they are released?  Get our excellent emails!

Spring cleaning and a desire to share the lace love have inspired us to do a BIG SPRING DESTASH, so if you love gourmet yarns and Tin Can Knits patterns, keep reading!

 

HOW TO ENTER ::: win gourmet yarn + patterns

Leave a comment on this blog post by the end of day May 31st 2014, answering this question:

“What’s your favourite Tin Can Knits pattern?”
(hint: you can check them all out here!)

To qualify you must include your ravelry user name in the comment, so that we can contact you if you win.

When do I get the goods?!  We will do a draw on Sunday, June 1st 2014 and announce the lucky winners on Facebook, Twitter, our Ravelry group, and on the blog too!

Tin Can Knits on FacebookTin Can Knits on Instagram Tin Can Knits on Twitter Tin Can Knits on Pinterest Tin Can Knits Email Updates button-ravelry-40

 

THE PRIZES ::: an ebook and luscious yarns

Handmade in the UK ::: Each winner gets a free ebook copy of Handmade in the UK… we think you will love these exquisite lace patterns.  Add your favourites to your ravelry queue now so you’re ready to cast on when your yarn arrives!

Lush Cardigan by Tin Can KnitsBotany Shawl by Tin Can KnitsBonny by Tin Can KnitsVivid by Tin Can KnitsLoch by Tin Can KnitsWindswept by Tin Can KnitsThistle by Tin Can KnitsEstuary by Tin Can KnitsRosewater Beret by Tin Can Knits

GOURMET YARNS ::: Ten lucky knitters will be mailed a special package with one of the beautiful yarns pictured below… It is up to random chance which yarn you get, but when we contact you for your mailing address, you can always ask that we mail this pretty present to a friend instead, if it doesn’t suit your taste!

Browse all the juicy prizes below!

2 skeins of Skein Queen 'Voluptuous' (1120 yds) courtesy of Skein Queen ... shop her impressive range here.

2 skeins of Skein Queen ‘Voluptuous’ (1120 yds) courtesy of Skein Queen … shop her impressive range here.

1 skein of Old Maiden Aunt 'Bluefaced Leicester 4ply' (400 yds), courtesy of Old Maiden Aunt; check out her new season colourways here.

1 skein of Old Maiden Aunt ‘Bluefaced Leicester 4ply’ (400 yds), courtesy of Old Maiden Aunt; check out her new season colourways here.

2 skeins of Orkney Angora 'aurora' (874 yds), courtesy of Orkney Angora... order this luxury angora blend here.

2 skeins of Orkney Angora ‘aurora’ (874 yds), courtesy of Orkney Angora… order this luxury angora blend here.

2 skeins of Malabrigo Lace ... this would work great with Botany too...

2 skeins of Malabrigo Lace (940 yds) … this would work great for Botany too.

1 skein of The Uncommon Thread 'sumptuous DK' (250 yds) courtesy of The Uncommon Thread... learn more about her bold and modern colours here.

1 skein of The Uncommon Thread ‘sumptuous DK’ (250 yds) courtesy of The Uncommon Thread… check out her bold and modern colours here.

1 skein of Madelinetosh 'tosh merino DK' (225 yds) ... this would work beautifully for the Rosewater hat too!

1 skein of Madelinetosh ‘tosh merino DK’ (225 yds) … this would work beautifully for the Rosewater hat!

2 skeins of Yarn Pony 'ShowPony 4-ply' (874 yds) ... lovely for Thistle or Botany!

2 skeins of Yarn Pony ‘ShowPony 4-ply’ (874 yds) … lovely for Thistle or Botany, or any other big lace project!

1 skein of Skein Queen 'Opulent Cashmere' (200 yds), courtesy of Skein Queen... this is enough to make either the mittens or the hat!

1 skein of Skein Queen ‘Opulent Cashmere’ (200 yds), courtesy of Skein Queen… this is enough to make medium mittens or hat!

2 skeins of Shilasdair Luxury DK (660 yds)

2 skeins of Shilasdair Luxury DK (660 yds)… enough to make a kids size of Windswept… or a lovely Thistle stole?

2 skeins of Kettle Yarns 'Islington' (874 yds) courtesy of Kettle Yarn Co... check out their website for more beautiful yarns!

2 skeins of Kettle Yarns ‘Islington’ (874 yds) courtesy of Kettle Yarn Co… check out the shop for more beautiful yarns!  This would make an exquisite silver Thistle!

Want more from Emily and Alexa at Tin Can Knits?  If you enjoy our in-depth tutorials, modern designs, and down-to-earth chat, be sure to get our email updates (you’ll love our excellent subscriber specials), and join the conversation on Facebook, Instagram, Ravelry, Twitter and Pinterest!

Tin Can Knits Big Spring Destash

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