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Sitka Spruce Hat – DK weight pattern hack

November 21, 2014

sitka spruce hatAlexa isn’t the only one who has caught the hat knitting bug recently… I’ve been knitting up hats at a rapid rate too!

The Sitka Spruce hat, with its architecturally crisp twisted stitch pattern, is a pleasure to knit and makes a great gift.

sitka spruce hat

Nina bundled up on a blustery autumn day in Edinburgh.

Sitka Spruce HatSometimes you have the perfect yarn, and the perfect pattern… but the two don’t quite match up in terms of gauge.  This was the case with this project – I had an exquisite skein of Old Maiden Aunt Superwash Bluefaced Leicester, and I wanted to knit the Sitka Spruce hat.

The pattern is written for a worsted / aran weight yarn (that knits to 18 sts / 4″), and this DK weight yarn knits to 20-22 sts per inch, so I knew I would have to adjust the pattern somewhat.

Sitka Spruce Hat

I cast on more stitches, and worked the pattern stitch for more rounds, and the beanie came out exactly the right size!

How to knit the Sitka Spruce hat in DK weight yarn:

  • Cast on 112 stitches (this is 7 repeats of the 16-stitch pattern… rather than 6 for an aran weight beanie).  Work 1×1 rib brim.  I used 3.5mm needles for the ribbed brim, and 4.0mm needles for the remainder of the hat.
  • Work rounds 15-28 of chart A, then work rounds 1-28 again (this is 42 rounds, rather than the aran weight beanie has only 28).
  • Decrease following the decrease chart B.

These instructions will result in a beanie style hat.  For a beret style, you could cast on 112, work ribbing, then increase 32 sts evenly spaced, to 144 sts total, which is 9 pattern repeats, then work the 42 rounds as described above before decreasing.

Sitka Spruce Hat

I love Old Maiden Aunt’s yarns, and enjoyed a visit to her studio in West Kilbride last summer.  This particular colourway is ‘lon-dubh’ (blackbird), which has an exceptionally deep, dark and moody quality. I had a difficult time capturing its complexity and beauty in photos.

Old Maiden Aunt Superwash Bluefaced Leicester

Old Maiden Aunt Superwash Bluefaced Leicester in ‘lon dubh’ (blackbird)

What are you working on as the days get cold, and the holidays approach? 

Are you making special gifts or cuddly cozy knits just for you?  We’d love to hear about it and have you share your projects and stories with us!

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Some lovely hat patterns perfect for holiday gifting:


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7 Comments leave one →
  1. December 3, 2015 5:30 pm

    is this a difficult pattern? I’m a semi-confident knitter and looking for some more exciting hat patterns.

    • December 3, 2015 11:04 pm

      Not particularly, the twisted stitch is the only trick (and following the chart)

  2. Millicent Perez permalink
    February 12, 2015 11:56 am

    Thank you for this!! I am not so experienced a knitter as I would like to be. That being said I’m confused. I did cast on 112 and now started working pattern. But Sitka pattern I purchased has 15 stitch pattern not a 16. Is this a typo? Should I have only cast on 105 and still do 7 repeats of pattern?

  3. November 23, 2014 2:33 am

    Adorabile! Paola – Italy

  4. knittedblissjc permalink
    November 22, 2014 12:31 pm

    So gorgeous!! I love this design, it’s graphic and modern, yet really classic.

  5. Stephanie H. permalink
    November 21, 2014 4:53 pm

    I love the Sitka Spruce hat pattern. In fact, I am quite addicted to knitting this hat.

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