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How to Read a Knitting Pattern

October 8, 2020

Knitting is a simple, satisfying, stitch-by-stitch pursuit. However, to follow a knitting pattern, a beginner must first learn a number of knitting-pattern conventions. These include abbreviations, charts, multi-size text instructions, sizing, and schematic diagrams. We hope this tutorial series helps to clarify your uncertainties!

In this tutorial, we explain How to Read a Knitting Pattern in four parts:

Note: While each designer or publisher writes knitting patterns slightly differently, we tend to share common conventions. We describe our own Tin Can Knits pattern-writing conventions in these tutorials, but once you understand these conventions, the variations that other designers use will be easier to learn and understand.

Practice with a free pattern today!

Put your new learning to the test and get started with one of our free knitting patterns from The Simple Collection, a learn-to-knit series designed to help knitters make the next stitch and learn the next skill. And be sure to share this post with newer knitters you know who are still a little bit unclear about knitting-pattern conventions.

Are there any elements of pattern reading that you still find unclear? Comment on this post or contact us directly, so we can improve this teaching tool.

~ Emily and Alexa

2 Comments leave one →
  1. October 9, 2020 7:06 am

    your blog is amazing!

  2. October 8, 2020 6:15 am

    I made several pairs of socks from your Rye Light pattern to gift last Christmas. Thank you for that wonderful pattern—they were a hit.

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